Cerrado, Minas Gerais, Brazil

Take the state of Texas, multiply it by 3, and you’ve got the size of the cerrado (woodland savannah) of Brazil, one of the richest savannahs in the entire world in terms of biodiversity. But for coffee lovers, Cerrado refers to a region in the west of Minas Gerais state, Brazil. The clay mineral soil here necessitates ongoing fertilization, but coffee plants do like its hot, wet summers and pleasantly dry winters.

Cerrado de Minas, also referred to as West Minas or "Triângulo Mineiro," is the first coffee-producing region in Brazil to win Protected Geographical Indication (PGI). Coffees from here--usually natural or pulped natural processed--are balanced, with creamy mouthfeel and caramel-to-chocolate notes in the roast. Though coffee cultivation came to the Cerrado only 40 years ago, 90% of farms here range from medium-sized (2-300 hectares) to huge plantations. However, the Brazilian Forest Code now requires farmers to set aside 35% of their land for conservation.

Take the state of Texas, multiply it by 3, and you’ve got the size of the cerrado (woodland savannah) of Brazil, one of the richest savannahs in the entire world in terms of biodiversity. But for coffee lovers, Cerrado refers to a region in the west of Minas Gerais state, Brazil. The clay mineral soil here necessitates ongoing fertilization, but coffee plants do like its hot, wet summers and pleasantly dry winters.

Cerrado de Minas, also referred to as West Minas or "Triângulo Mineiro," is the first coffee-producing region in Brazil to win Protected Geographical Indication (PGI). Coffees from here--usually natural or pulped natural processed--are balanced, with creamy mouthfeel and caramel-to-chocolate notes in the roast. Though coffee cultivation came to the Cerrado only 40 years ago, 90% of farms here range from medium-sized (2-300 hectares) to huge plantations. However, the Brazilian Forest Code now requires farmers to set aside 35% of their land for conservation.

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