Jinotega, Nicaragua

Long before the conquistadores arrived, the Jinotega region was occupied. Artisans, farmers, warriors--descendants of Pre-Colombian peoples--filled the valleys and jungles with their rich and varied culture. The name itself is thought to come from the Nahuatl word "Xinotencatl," meaning alternately "City of the Eternal Men" or "Neighbors of the Jiñocuabos (Mangy tree)." This region, situated high in the Isabella mountain chain, grows between 65-80% of Nicaragua’s coffee. Soil here is fertile. Slopes are densely forested, misted by clouds, and home to huge biodiversity.

Jinotega shares its northern border with Honduras, and the region is a wonder of cliffs, waterfalls, hotsprings, and of course, quality coffee. In fact, over 30 coffees from this region have placed in Cup of Excellence competitions. The coffee sector is mostly made up of smallholder farmers with 1-3 hectares of land.

Long before the conquistadores arrived, the Jinotega region was occupied. Artisans, farmers, warriors--descendants of Pre-Colombian peoples--filled the valleys and jungles with their rich and varied culture. The name itself is thought to come from the Nahuatl word "Xinotencatl," meaning alternately "City of the Eternal Men" or "Neighbors of the Jiñocuabos (Mangy tree)." This region, situated high in the Isabella mountain chain, grows between 65-80% of Nicaragua’s coffee. Soil here is fertile. Slopes are densely forested, misted by clouds, and home to huge biodiversity.

Jinotega shares its northern border with Honduras, and the region is a wonder of cliffs, waterfalls, hotsprings, and of course, quality coffee. In fact, over 30 coffees from this region have placed in Cup of Excellence competitions. The coffee sector is mostly made up of smallholder farmers with 1-3 hectares of land.

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